On occasion, it’s exciting to scroll through the StanceWorks archives. There’s a lot of memories buried deep in there: incredible cars, amazing trips, and phenomenal people, all immortalized through texts and photographs. Yesterday, while hunting photos down, I came across Jonathan Braswell’s ’89 535i, and fondly recalled the afternoon spent in Helen, Georgia, with him, our friends, and of course, his gorgeous car.

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The E36 hasn’t always been the car it is today. For years, it has spent time as the least-appreciated M car of them all: a sort of “every man’s M3” lacking the intricacies that make the Ms that precede and succeed it so special. A decade ago, it was claimed that E36s would never be worth their weight in steel: they simply made too many of them.

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We were five or six days into our trip, four-wheeling our way across the Colorado wilderness. As we made our way down the 550 freeway, we descended upon Ouray County’s only stoplight, nestled in Ridgway where the 62 freeway meets the 550. With a town population of less than 1,000, it’s a quiet place, perched at the doorstep of the San Juan Mountains, and was to be our stopping point for the afternoon.

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“An object in motion tends to stay in motion.” At least, that’s what I’ve been told. Here at the shop, we’ve built up some momentum and posses what feels like considerable inertia. As StanceWorks chugs along with the momentum it has built over the last ten years, Riley and I have found our groove with Protomachine: the shop is filled to the brim with projects, some we can share and others we cannot.

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It was, undoubtedly, the coldest night of the trip, although at just shy of 11,000 feet, with small patches of snow still on the ground, that doesn’t quite come as a surprise. The clearing we had found to camp in filled with sunlight bright and early, rousting everyone from their slumber well before 8:00am. First on the list was for Jim Bob and I to move our tents into the sun; the morning dew was heavy, and condensation filled the nooks and crannies from the night before.

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