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Thread: My old Honda - NA1 NSX

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    Default My old Honda - NA1 NSX

    hello all,

    (just incase you want to follow more live updates my instagram is @restomod_compulsion)

    this is my first post on the site but I've been reading for years. Never really thought about doing a build thread as the attention isn't something I particularly relish, and most forums I've been on seem to have less than pleasant members. After reading over the build threads on here, even if people don't seem to agree on certain choices, they have a respect for the chap doing it. So In the end, I thought sod it. This is why I tend not to post on forums much, as a lot of my build decisions would just result in negativity, and whilst I don't really care, there seems little point in painting a target on your back.

    anywhoo enough of my inane ramblings, here's the car as I first saw her:










    she's a 1991 Honda NSX, and at the time, was currently residing in a little garage in the Okayama Prefecture of japan. Which is about 6000 miles from where I currently live.

    Up until this point I had been searching for a few months, and missed out on some cars I had fell for by a day (sometimes a few hours). As most know, the feeling of missing out on the car you really wanted can be a really kick in the swingers. This gave me a little more urgency than was probably sensible.

    Within a few hours of it been posted for sale, I had negotiated a deal, and a deposit was place. Again, some perspective is required here. It was essentially on the other side of the world. I couldn't look at it with my own eyes and was placing my trust completely in an agent used by my importer, with most of my adult savings. This actually only occurred to me a few weeks after it arrived at my house (some months later). As after I placed my deposit I was bouncing of the walls with excitement, due to the fact that I currently owned a car that I had been wanting since I was of single digit age.

    Anyways, a deal was struck and it was sent to the nearest port for the long sea journey, to the not so sunny shores of the country I reside in. These were some of the pictures I was sent when it got to the Japanese port.








    Now, again, a few things struck me, a while after they probably should have. Firstly, the paint had seen better days (to put it lightly). In reality it look liked it been washed using the dangerous end of a porcupine. The centre console was butchered to fit a double din, and looked to have been undertaken by a blind woodsman. It had the right height that most rock crawlers would envy and a steering wheel that looked at home in a harlequin golf. However, all this was blinded by the aforementioned wall bouncing excitement. Live and learn I suppose.

    The steering wheel I'm assuming was fitted just to sell the car (the previous owner probably wanted to keep whichever was in there) and the ride height was to make loading and unloading the car a lot easier. Like I said though, I didn't really see any of that. Just that it was mine, and that it was on its way....

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    So whilst I was waiting the millennia it took to arrive, and trying to understand why my savings account was a fair few zero's lighter than before, I was able to study the pictures and try to figure out what was fitted to the car.

    Information was pretty light, all I got was "its mostly stock". Which was fine, I had assumed it would be, but being a particular sort of person I wanted to know about the few things that was fitted.

    from what I could figure out it had the following:

    Border Racing Lip kit
    Work Emotion CR Kai 18" rear and 17" front.
    work wheel nuts
    Tein Coilovers
    Some funky steering wheel (and presuming boss to go with it)
    hkb/type r steering boss
    Taitec GTLW exhaust

    Again, some perspective is required here. Whilst that spec list doesn't seem impressive. Parts for this car are a bit more than what I was used to. For example the exhaust is the best part of $1600 before shipping etc so I was happy with what I got, to say the least.

    After it traversed most of the worlds ocean, doing battle with legendary creatures such as the kraken, mothra and the british import and tax office, I got sent these pictures:



    ]




    considering this car is 25 years old, to see the condition of the underneath, I knew I made the right decision. And of course, by "decision", I mean complete and under gamble with most of my life savings. But I digress.

    It had clearly been looked after despite the questionable methods of stereo installation (see: blind woodsman comment above) and was modified enough (and worn enough) that I wouldn't feel guilty in chopping and changing things about.

    yet more waiting occurred whilst the importer did his thing and fixing a few bits whilst he had it (a few stone chips on the front and a polish etc). At this point I had little else on the brain but the car and the logistics of retrieving it.

    I'm somewhat cautious by nature, so driving it the 300 odd miles back from the importer to my house didn't seem sensible. I figured it had been laid up for a while and lack of use can really do some damage to a car. So I made the decision to get it trailered to my house. Which is where the fun began...

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    As I was waiting for the importer to do his thing I got the occasional update on progress:

    bumper removed for touch up:


    engine bay detail:






    As I said, the decision to get it trailered was an easy one. I didn't want my first experience of the car to be broken down on the side of a busy motorway, questioning certain life choices I made, and why I didn't take up knitting as a hobby instead.

    What seemed like 5 or 6 lifetimes ( a week or so), I got a phone call to say the car had left and would be with me in a few hours.

    After being on edge all day at work, waiting for a phone call so I could dash home, I was somewhat perplexed when it got to 7:00pm and I had no idea where my car was. I spoke to the importer who was equally apologetic and confused. I asked for the couriers numbers so I could sort it out (seemed little point at that stage to go through the importer, even though he said he would sort it, as it would just add complication to the process).

    Well, the chap answered and seemed somewhat taken aback by my anxiety at the fact that I didn't know who he was, where my car was or why it didn't arrive when he said it would (the cheek of me eh?).

    Apparently he hadn't been given a delivery address (bollocks) so just took it back to his unit instead. Why in gods name you would pick up a car you didn't know where to take, is beyond me. I'm no transportation expert but it seems a destination address would be one of the first things to ask for. Such is life.

    There seemed zero point in getting worked up by this as it wouldn't change much. I made sure it was safe, made sure he had insurance (again he seemed insulted that I asked) and gave him the address to where I wanted the car delivered. I also gave him implicit instructions to phone me when he was half an hour away, so I could dash home to unload etc.

    Again, the next day I was checking my phone every 4 minutes, waiting for the equivalent of santa claus to ring and say its Christmas morning. To say the day dragged on would be an understatement.

    5:00pm rolled around and I'm getting increasingly nervous, with friends texting me every few hours too see if the car arrived. No car, no transporter, no 8 year olds 20 year old dream.

    aAfew hours later I got a phone call. Apparently the low loader they use to transport "sports cars" (his words) was being used and as such, will be delivered tomorrow. Now, this is about the time I thought about calling his mother a hamster and telling him his father smelled like elderberries, but it wouldn't solve anything or get my car quicker. So more waiting.

    The next day, on my lunch hour I got this view:



    what sucks is, I had enough time to unload it, sign off the car wasn't damaged and put it in the garage before I had to get back to work. That was THE longest afternoon I can remember..

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    so yeah, at work staring at these all afternoon:



    At first I couldn't figure out why the remote was so big and why it didn't work (even after ew battery etc).

    Turns out that It wasn't radio but infrared, and you have to point it at the sensor to get it to work, from about 3 inches away. The crazy Japanese :P (it took me weeks to figure this out)

    Apparently it was only an option in 91 and soon got replaced by a standard central locking remote that wasn't hewn from granite.

    So after a few days off getting to know the car, I figured out what needed doing and how soon.

    first up was an oil and filter, obviously.



    there are two types of oil filter for my car from Honda, the tall ones, and the short ones. Honda don't do tall ones anymore, and being that a larger filter area can hardly be a bad thing, I chose to use a MAHLE filter instead (oem to some big german companies). It arrived under MANN branding, bar a small sticker on the box and filter stating it was MAHLE. Add to that some Mobil 1 (which was a bit thick) but rather have thick oil, than old oil. Besides it was at the height of summer so wouldn't do any harm (a barmy 70f :P)



    upon driving the car, the comically small steering wheel made it pretty bad experience (no power steering on early models) coupled with federal 595 rsr tyres (semi slicks) and my puny noodle arms couldn't move it. So in went a personal wheel:



    actual in went a old nardi at first, but no pictures, so it didn't happen :P

    I also had to do something about this mess (you can just see the nardi in this picture):


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    The next thing was to lower it back to a normal height and get the alignment done. The roads around my area are pretty awful with speedbumps. So to ensure I didn't scrape, I went and measured the height of the largest speedbump I could find and set the height to clear that.

    Also the stock suspension arms don't really allow enough alignment adjustment to allow for the car to go super low without some funky alignment settings.

    So anyways, to make sure I was paying for alignment and not for un-seizing bolts, I went over everything to make sure nothing was stuck. I also took out all the bolts and gave them a good covering in surprisingly expensive mil spec silicone grease (I kid you not, mil spec grease :P)



    much to my surprise, the front caster arms were not seized. If you know anything about the car, they pretty much seized solid a few days out of the factory, so to have them loose is really quite rare. Again, a testament to the previous owners treatment of the car (and climate presumably).



    again they got a good greasing to prevent it happening in the future :P

    so after all this it looked like this:



    I know it could be lower, but I can literally drive it anywhere and know that my incredibly expensive lip will survive :P

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    Sweet baby Jesus, your car looks soooooo damn good. Subscribed!
    And the Lord said unto John, "Come forth and receive eternal life." But John came fifth and won a toaster.

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    Great read so far! Sweet nsx!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    @cblock406

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanuelparedes View Post
    Sweet baby Jesus, your car looks soooooo damn good. Subscribed!
    Quote Originally Posted by cblock406 View Post
    Great read so far! Sweet nsx!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    thanks chaps

    there's loads to update but just need to sit down and sort through photos

    so onto the centre console butchery:




    There was a few options I could of done. By a new OEM one and stick with the OEM stereo. Not really my thing.

    Buy a cheap aftermarket fibreglass one (I say cheap, they are like $300) however they warp and you have to cut out the hole for the stereo yourself.

    Buy an expensive one, which is a direct bolt in, but its like $1000.

    So I did the only sensible thing and fix the one I had. The previous owner even had to cut up the stock ashtray to fit the double din unit. So that was scrap. I could replace it, but considering this car would never see ash I didn't really see the point. The 12v socket is integrated into the ash tray though and they do come in useful occasionally so decided I need to retain something to charge my phone etc.

    You can also see a little vent in the bottom left of that picture. This is for the aspirator fan, which is part of the air conditioning system. This fan mounts to the ash tray so will need to work out how to retain the fan and get rid of the ashtray. Now considering the average temperature of England is about 40f, air conditioning is not really needed. But for the 2 or 3 days we get of summer, I want it working dammit!

    so started by cleaning up what I already had using a JCB :P.





    then introducing some plastic to actually work with, I didn't want to fibreglass the entire thing as it tends to warp unless you use a lot. So some ABS plate was used along with the stereo surround of my Clarion Head unit:





    marking up some of the stuff I wanted to fit:




    cut out for the stereo and gauge controller:




    more holes cut for gauges and filler primed:




    the alarm LED needs to be relocated to the centre console (will explain later) and decided to countersink it to make it a bit neater:








    now in primer:




    mock up with gauges and base coat:


    support plate for the gauge controller bent up and in primer:




    with the 12v USB ports and 1 music usb port:







    fitted the USB ports:




    and fitted, this is finished in black texture coat. The stock console is painted in a metallic bronze which I didn't particularly like. I think if I painted it the OEM colour it would look too "aftermarket" if you get me? I think the black texture coat sort of dums down the fact I stuck a load of gauges in it :P



    the keen eyed amongst you will see the blue light on the USB ports, the rest of the console gauges are green, so out it came...



    and




    I also put on an OEM Honda connector, I can connect it to the stock 12v wiring without having to cut anything up, here is a picture:



    you have to be really careful before you decide to cut anything on the car as finding a replacement is not only a nightmare, but tends to cost a huge amount of money :S


    wrapped all the edges in anti rattle foam:




    and all together:






    now all this looks simple in text, the reality however is that is took an insane amount of hours to complete. I stopped counting at 20 :P

    I chopped and changed the head unit about, that's why its different in pictures. I had to make an adjustable bracket up to mount the headunit, that's why it looks a little "sunken" in the photos as its not in its final position yet.

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    Oh, I always had a sweet spot for NSX and yours looks technichally mint (at least from below).

    Also I understand the load of work needed to fabricate parts like your center console, however it looks still a bit DIY. I think a nice layer of alcantara would fix that. What do you think?
    Quote Originally Posted by getamongst-it View Post

    Lower your expectations, you'll be much happier.
    Oh, and your car too.

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    That's a beautiful car and a very nice fix on the center console, but I have one question... why censor your key?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagah View Post
    Oh, I always had a sweet spot for NSX and yours looks technichally mint (at least from below).

    Also I understand the load of work needed to fabricate parts like your center console, however it looks still a bit DIY. I think a nice layer of alcantara would fix that. What do you think?
    thanks bud to be fair in the photos it does look at bit that way in the light but in real life its a lot less "shiny" and matches the rest of the OEM black texture spot on


    Quote Originally Posted by nishy View Post
    That's a beautiful car and a very nice fix on the center console, but I have one question... why censor your key?
    thanks lol erm unreasonable paranoia? :P

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    By the way! Bitch! I seriously was over that phase longing over an NSX because they already gotten pretty expensive in Germany.

    And now what now? I got the hots for it again...
    Quote Originally Posted by getamongst-it View Post

    Lower your expectations, you'll be much happier.
    Oh, and your car too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagah View Post
    By the way! Bitch! I seriously was over that phase longing over an NSX because they already gotten pretty expensive in Germany.

    And now what now? I got the hots for it again...

    lol well to help ease the pain, here was a shot taken shortly after the above work was done at a cars and coffee meet :P



    Moving on I wanted to fit a few more gauges and without the real estate available i had to come up with something.

    Most people tend the fit the optional sat nav pod, however its a bit big and cumbersome and doesnt really flow well with the dash:




    There are a few japanese companies that produce gauge pods but it replaces your centre vents and are expensive when you factor in shipping, import duty, tax etc however if i lived in japan i would just buy one as they are relative cheap for what you get.

    so i decided to make one.

    This is what i started with, because the nsx dash is so flat, this lines up quite well.




    However there are a few features that need changing. Mostly the duck bill type cover on the top.

    bleugh.




    That's better, all smooth and radiused.




    Also, as with the centre console, i wanted to flush mount the gauges as i think it looks a bit nicer.

    In order to do this i needed to thicknen up the front face of the gauge mount.

    made up a few of these:




    you see what im getting at:




    and fitted:




    details are somewhat sketch after this for some reason, maybe i forgot to bring my camera? anyways it ended up like this:



    Right before you say it, i know the wire coming out the side is not ideal. But ill be damned if I'm going to drill a hole in my dash just for some aftermarket gauges. Its run out of site after the dash so there is only an inch or so showing, plus its installed with a grommet and techflex so it looks neat. Everything's a compromise right?

    and here they are starting up

    http://vidmg.photobucket.com/albums/...psyem1jzps.mp4

    and some interior shots with the new wheel etc


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    When I read the title I was expecting an EG with the bumper hanging off but this is quite the surprise. Nice job on the center console. It really looks like it blends nicely with the rest of the interior.


    I/G: DeltaAlpha9

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeltaAlpha9 View Post
    When I read the title I was expecting an EG with the bumper hanging off but this is quite the surprise. Nice job on the center console. It really looks like it blends nicely with the rest of the interior.
    cheers bud

    yeah lol thought it would attract less attention with the title. Most non Honda people wouldn't bother to look

    anyways, a few details i sort of glossed over on the steering wheel.

    like i said i replaced the Nardi with my new Personal Grinta steering wheel

    I also had to replace the works bell boss with the shorter version (still works bell) because i also wanted to fit my NRG snap off boss.




    I wanted to do something different with the fasteners, so i used some special aircraft fasteners (not strictly in the right application) that are made from titanium and have a flush front:





    looks different, especially now they have been heat anodised

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    I have mad love for the NSX...looks so awesome !

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    Awesome build!
    lamborfuckinghini

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    Man, the PO did all of the mods I've ever dreamed about if I got my hands on an NSX, minus the blue wheel and cut console. Glad to see what you've done! Love the gauge pods as well.

    Here on Stance|Works it's imperative that even though you may disagree with the modifications or the kind of vehicle in question, that you respect the work that has gone into it and try to avoid personal attacks. I myself am guilty of this, but live and learn. It's not in the official rules, but it's something that has been ingrained into the site after some time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MadMax View Post
    I have mad love for the NSX...looks so awesome !
    cheers bud

    Quote Originally Posted by white out View Post
    Awesome build!
    thanks, means a lot

    Quote Originally Posted by rice4life View Post
    Man, the PO did all of the mods I've ever dreamed about if I got my hands on an NSX, minus the blue wheel and cut console. Glad to see what you've done! Love the gauge pods as well.

    Here on Stance|Works it's imperative that even though you may disagree with the modifications or the kind of vehicle in question, that you respect the work that has gone into it and try to avoid personal attacks. I myself am guilty of this, but live and learn. It's not in the official rules, but it's something that has been ingrained into the site after some time.
    yeah certainly seems that way


    The next on the list occurred mostly through happenstance. I was looking after an industrial carpet cleaner (as you do) and decided to give the shag a quick clean.....

    for some reason all the 90's Japanese cars I've imported have come with shag pile floor mats :P

    weapon of choice:







    and this is what came off the floor mats....GAAARosss!



    so having been suitably disgusted with the floor mats, i figured whilst i have it, i may as well do the rest of the carpets, so out came the seats:









    and the results :S:



    whilst the carpets were drying, I thought i would do some re-greasing of the seat mechanism's to make them all smooth and quiet:





    when that was done, thought i would take the carpets up and give the floors a good clean and see what i could find:
    ewwwwww









    and all clean :








    All the buried TREASHAA!



    This included 13 yen, so in the spirit of the former tv series House, I named the car "13".


    and found mismatching seat bolts, so ordered some new from honda and in they went:




  20. #20
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    as some of you may have noticed i am rocking a silver looking gearknob type thing. Well I've had the gearknob for a few years and it started to look a bit worse for wear.

    its a Spoon titanium gearknob (can you tell i have a penchant for titanium), weighs basically nothing and used to look quite pretty.

    heres what i started with:




    and after some polishing and some heat anodising:






    nearly as good as new


    and more titanium news.

    I was looking around for titanium wheels nuts and was stumbling across a problem. I could buy Porsche, ferrari etc wheels nuts which i would trust, but come with a price tag to match ($1000 plus)

    or i could buy aftermarket wheel nuts ($400 ish), but that poses its own set of problems. When you buy material, whether its steel, aluminium, etc you need to know that the specific alloy that your buying (6061, 6082, s275 etc) is what it should be. So when you buy raw material, your issued with whats called a material certificate. This basically is like a receipt, stating the content of the alloy that you are buying. Problem is that in some countries, you can buy the material, have the certificate, and its still not what its supposed to be.

    So bearing in mind that wheel nuts are sort of important, and that I would be getting some for my brother as well, I took it upon myself to make some. That way I could pick a material, pick a supplier I trust and then get a machinist I trust to carry out the work.

    Now you would think that its fairly simple. Buy some hex bar, chop it up, tap it, bobs your mothers brother :P

    Nope. As labour/machines have become cheaper, hex bar has some what fell out of favour (at least in the more exotic materials). So that means i have to start with some bar and then get it machined completely.

    test piece:



    steel one for comparison:




    Well, a butt load of cash later, some really knackered machine tool, and few test pieces, we have these:






    the shiny ones are mine, the matt ones are my brothers (different thread pitch)

    add some anodising:



    now as you can see, the weight savings in isolation are minimal. However, what you have to understand is that most of what i do is an exercise in "why not". Mostly just to see if i can or if its possible.

    I ended up with the quality and grade of titanium that is used for the OEM market at a fraction of the price.

    Was it worth it financially for weight savings? probably not but its kinda badass none the less :P

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    this thing is a masterpiece! I love all the fine details that are being paid attention to!
    Keep up the phenomenal work! And include some more full body shots of that beautiful black NSX
    Some people will never understand it, why we do what we do.
    The busted knuckles and the late nights in the garage;
    it's more than a hobby or pastime, it's a lifestyle. We live it."


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    Quote Originally Posted by Loaf31 View Post

    this thing is a masterpiece! I love all the fine details that are being paid attention to!
    Keep up the phenomenal work! And include some more full body shots of that beautiful black NSX
    Thanks but I think "masterpiece" is maybe a bit over doing it but thanks for the kind works though much appreciated

    A bit out of the order in which I did things, but I thought I would post the next big instalment.

    In terms of wheels, a lot of people go with an 18" rear and 17" front combination because the car comes with staggered diameter wheels as standard. As I want to fit bigger brakes up front I need an 18" wheel, and as I would never run a 19" wheel in the rear, I had to go with 18" all round.

    As for the wheel, I have always wanted a particular set. Mostly due to the rarity and quality of construction.



    they didn't start of this way however, when i got them, they were this colour:




    all assembled:




    and finally on the car




    The wheels of course are Desmond Marquis Promada. A lot like the Regamaster they are famous for but ever so slightly different in how the centre cap is seated (regamasters are flush with no centre cap).

    These wheels are sort of special. In the 90's they were produced by a company called Desmond using a particular piece of press tooling in Russia. They had to use the Russian equipment, as at the time, It was the only Forging Press capable of the pressure that was required. From what i can gather, It was used to create railway parts in a former life (details are sketchy so maybe wrong).

    They really are a special wheel and as I've wanted a set for a long time, so I sold the Work CR Kai's and purchased these. Problem is that most sets were used for racing cars smaller japanese cars in the 90's (civics etc). This means that most sets are either 15" or 16".

    18's are super rare, and if they do come up for sale, they are usually gtr fitment (i.e. non staggered and low offset). I managed to find a set of four in the correct rear fitment I needed (18x9.5 et45R), and managed to find a pair in Seattle that I needed for the front (18x8.5 et30). Now as you can guess, you cant really go super low offset on the NSX. In fact, most people said that my front fitment was far to aggressive and that It would never fit. However if I wanted an 18" in the front, this was the thinnest, weakest offset that was available, so i kind of had no choice :P

    The keen eye'd amongst you will notice that the rear offset is designated et45R, the "R" specially means that you get extra space for large brakes (stands for Racing apparently :s).

    A few more shots with my brothers Supra (single turbo, 570bhp)






  23. #23
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    carrying on with the gauges theme I thought I would share the restoration of my defi gauges.

    Now for those that don't know, defi are a subsidiary company for Nippon Seiki, a Japanese company that makes gauges and clusters for lots of large OEM cars and motorbikes, they even made the gauge cluster in the NSX (as in the standard dash clocks). The sensors and gauges are the best quality that I have found in any aftermarket gauge. I've gone through lots and always come back to Defi. Plus its like an OEM+ addition as they are the same brand as stock :P

    Anyways, I've had these gauges for about 10 years now through various cars (I bet those who bought autogauge or stri gauges wont be saying similar :P) and anyone who knows these gauges understands that the only failure mode (that is common across the board) is the electrical plug/sockets. The thing is, the plug is fairly difficult to "unplug" from the gauge or link meter. This means they end up getting yanked on with force and then the wires separate from the plug terminals. Boo.

    the terminals and plug:



    Now there are a few options with this. You can buy new wires from Defi, however outside of japan they are quite expensive (due to shipping, tax, import fees etc.)

    If your semi electrically savvy, you can buy new plugs and terminals and repair them. Problem is that you cannot buy the electrical plugs from the standard retailers (rsonline, mouser, digikey etc). I literally spent a year on and off trying to find who makes them and where I can buy them (in all honesty it got the stage where I just enjoyed the treasure hunt and was well beyond practical reasons). Well eventually I found them, found a supplier, and then found the minimum order quantity (10,000). So....balls to that then.

    So the next option, which is what I did, is to make entirely new looms out of overspec'd components, costing many times what the replacement parts cost and completely defeating the object of the exercise in the first place.

    so first up, box full of bits:



    this included,

    Teflon coated, mil spec cable
    all new water proof connectors for the sensors (retainers, terminals, seals, housings)
    all new pugs and sockets for gauges (terminals, seals etc)
    techflex expanding cable cover
    Raychem glue lined heat shrink

    first up was the sensors, new plugs:






    seals for terminals:




    mate one with t'other:




    new retaining plate (yellow bit):



    rinse, repeat and boom, good as new:

    :

    Next is the gauges themselves,


    This is the awkward plug on the gauges, they are a real pain:




    Whip that out:




    New ones in:




    Before and After:




    New link cables and power cables:








    Laying out the new loom with the Teflon coated, silver plated cable:



    Plugs etc on:




    Running the newly constructed loom in the factory cable clips:




    and all in and working (click the below picture):




    now, like I said. This whole process was an exercise in pointlessness. It cost a huge amount and functions no better than OEM. I just like to build things, and having never built a wiring loom from these sorts of materials before, I thought the gauges would be a cool project. I've ended up with the most over spec'd wiring loom ever but who can put a price on fun :P

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    115

    Default

    at little project that made a world of difference was sorting out the key that came with the car




    now people refer to this as the "titanium" key, when it just isn't. I have more titanium in the dirt under my fingernails than this key has. It is in fact made out of an alloy called "monel" which is a Nickel-Copper alloy. Its a cool material none the less (I know I'm playing a little fast and loose with the word "cool" but bear with me). In the 60's it was used in the skins of experimental rockets due to the stability at high temperatures and is hugely corrosion resistant.

    So anyways, after 25 years it was a bit manky. Considering its about $150 to replace, I decided to refresh this one.

    Some polishing, paint and cleaning later and we have this:





    Problem was now I'm too scared to scratch it :S so I bought a few crappy plastics ones to use on a day to day basis.



    I needed to anyways as the car originally came with 3 keys, the monel one (pretty) a replica of the metal one in black plastic, and the one pictured above (the valet key). I have a propensity to lose things, so I use the plastics ones as they are cheaper to replace :P


    a couple of other issues was some of the plastic clips around the engine bay were broken and the props weren't secure. So a few quid later and we have some new ones:







    Also the engine hatch release would often not work on really hot days (the plastic would warp and not turn the square shaft to release the hatch) so an extortionate amount of money later and we have a new one from Honda.






    its the little things that I find make such a difference with the ownership. Not having to mess around trying to get your hatch open or not having the bonnet props flailing about is such a small thing that makes such a big difference in general feelings towards using the car.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    271

    Default

    I absolutely love the attention to detail you're putting in this, and refurbishing everything! more more more!

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