Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 162

Thread: The Fabrication/Welding Thread

  1. #26

    Default

    I'm using an el'chepo flux wire welder to do all my fab-work etc. It's a real simple welder, but if you take some time, and clean it often, the low cost really pays you back.

    It got ten settings for the feed of the wire, and two for the strenght. Max and Min.

    Welded on some steel for the steering blockers on the s14( nothing that supports anything ), and even without cleaning anything before or after, the job it does is decent.




    I use, almost every day, a stick welder/or and MIG with work, but that's just for prepping excavator buckets, so that is pretty straight forward welding.

    I really like the flux welder, because of the simple design, and you don't have to carry around on any gas bottles etc.

    I'm looking to get into some more acetylen/oxygen welding again. Need tips for that. Love how it welds, but it's been a long time.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chadds Ford, PA
    Posts
    6,179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.Doban View Post
    There's a small welding supplies shop local to me. They sell wire and pretty much everything else including filling tanks. Maybe try Google searching for shops near you. I suspect you'd get better results from a phone book though as most of these guys are old school.

    ------------------------------------------------------------

    So I tried the red tungsten like SheaMoose suggested and it worked perfectly on the mild steel! Thanks, man!

    However, I'm still having a lot of trouble actually tacking two pieces of aluminum together. They both just burn away from each other. What are some recommended settings (amps, balance, frequency, arc force) for say, 1/16" aluminum?

    Another issue I have is this: if I try using thicker aluminum and turn the amps up to compensate, the tungsten melts up into the cap pretty quickly... like in 2 seconds. About 1/8" tungsten. Help.
    Google didn't yield any results. But the phone book may work. Damn technologies.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chadds Ford, PA
    Posts
    6,179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrA View Post
    I'm using an el'chepo flux wire welder to do all my fab-work etc. It's a real simple welder, but if you take some time, and clean it often, the low cost really pays you back.

    It got ten settings for the feed of the wire, and two for the strenght. Max and Min.

    Welded on some steel for the steering blockers on the s14( nothing that supports anything ), and even without cleaning anything before or after, the job it does is decent.




    I use, almost every day, a stick welder/or and MIG with work, but that's just for prepping excavator buckets, so that is pretty straight forward welding.

    I really like the flux welder, because of the simple design, and you don't have to carry around on any gas bottles etc.

    I'm looking to get into some more acetylen/oxygen welding again. Need tips for that. Love how it welds, but it's been a long time.
    Pretty clean bead for flux core. Not too much splatter either or did you already chip those off?

  4. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrg7243 View Post
    Pretty clean bead for flux core. Not too much splatter either or did you already chip those off?
    Just brushed it of with a steel brush. Splatter is pretty good also. And the flux wire is cheapo. 10$ for 2kg.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Nick, like people have said, prep the surface. With rust, a simple wire wheel will not do. Grind off the rust. Second, it looks like you are either not using any gas or you had forgotten to turn the gas on.

    For thin metal like that (sheet metal, exhaust tubing) don't try to lay a full bean down just yet. It's really hard and you'll either blow right through or warp the steel. Instead, do a bunch of small single tacks. Start with about three tacks spread out around the pipe to hold it together, then connect them with more tacks.

    If you want to practice, grab some flat scrap steel, clean it up (no oil, grease or rust) and try tacking, laying beads on that. once you can do that, grab another piece and try to weld them together.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chadds Ford, PA
    Posts
    6,179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrA View Post
    Just brushed it of with a steel brush. Splatter is pretty good also. And the flux wire is cheapo. 10$ for 2kg.
    Yeah, the problem is you dont get great penetration with flux, and they usually dont look that clean.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Okay, so I have another question for the masters.

    I tried my hand at TIG welding some mild steel exhaust piping together using the advice given to me from several people in this thread. It turned out so much better than previous attempts! However, I tried doing it without filler rod as to have one less variable to worry about.

    After looking at the backside of the weld, I could see that it fully penetrated the steel. So my question is, at what point/situations do you need filler rod?

    Here's how the welds turned out.The upper weld was my second attempt. Please critique me.
    Last edited by M.Doban; 02-24-2014 at 07:58 PM.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  8. #33

    Default

    wait those are actually two pieces of pipe joining? or you just went over the pipe to create those beads?

    If those are two pieces joining that's pretty solid for steel and no filler. I often go without filler rod for a lot of my tig work if the metal has tight tolerance (good fit up is crucial to good tig welding). If you have any gap though, even more so with steel, filler is a must.

    Try to grab some stainless scrap tube and join two pipes. Stainless has amazing bonding properties and will melt into the bead, thus hardly ever need filler if your tolerances (fit up) is tight.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.Doban View Post
    Okay, so I have another question for the masters.

    I tried my hand at TIG welding some mild steel exhaust piping together using the advice given to me from several people in this thread. It turned out so much better than previous attempts! However, I tried doing it without filler rod as to have one less variable to worry about.

    After looking at the backside of the weld, I could see that it fully penetrated the steel. So my question is, at what point/situations do you need filler rod?

    Here's how the welds turned out.The upper weld was my second attempt. Please critique me.
    The weld above is undercut this is fairly common when fusion welding, when you introduce filler rod appropriately this will not occur. You basically want a slight convex shape to your weld especially on tubing.

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EasySpeed*Inc View Post
    The weld above is undercut this is fairly common when fusion welding, when you introduce filler rod appropriately this will not occur. You basically want a slight convex shape to your weld especially on tubing.
    Gotcha. Thank you! I'll have to grab some thinner filler rod as the stuff I have right now is much too big.


    Quote Originally Posted by Heist View Post
    wait those are actually two pieces of pipe joining? or you just went over the pipe to create those beads?

    If those are two pieces joining that's pretty solid for steel and no filler. I often go without filler rod for a lot of my tig work if the metal has tight tolerance (good fit up is crucial to good tig welding). If you have any gap though, even more so with steel, filler is a must.

    Try to grab some stainless scrap tube and join two pipes. Stainless has amazing bonding properties and will melt into the bead, thus hardly ever need filler if your tolerances (fit up) is tight.
    Both of those beads are joining two pieces of pipe.

    Thanks! That answers my question. I'll have to source some stainless now and give it a shot.
    Last edited by M.Doban; 02-24-2014 at 08:41 PM.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sequim WA
    Posts
    7,684

    Default

    Question for you guys.

    I've been looking online for info on doing pie cut welding. Is there like a set of templates that people use for cutting out the sections so they are even or is it just by eye?

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jlyons617 View Post
    Question for you guys.

    I've been looking online for info on doing pie cut welding. Is there like a set of templates that people use for cutting out the sections so they are even or is it just by eye?
    There probably are, but I have always just used a bandsaw and cut the pipe at an angle, rotated it 180 degrees, and cut again. Rinse and repeat.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sequim WA
    Posts
    7,684

    Default

    Makes sense. Now I just need a small bandsaw.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Baltimore
    Posts
    2,435

    Default

    for all those asking, i was using my buddies welder (i dont have one) but i guess its just a flux? i'm not sure. but there was no gas involved

    IG: Nick475

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.Doban View Post
    Gotcha. Thank you! I'll have to grab some thinner filler rod as the stuff I have right now is much too big.


    Heist, both of those beads are joining two pieces of pipe.

    Thanks! That answers my question too. I'll have to source some stainless now and give it a shot.
    Also if your looking for filler buy .035, .045 and 1/16 should cover most anything exhaust related

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EasySpeed*Inc View Post
    Also if your looking for filler buy .035, .045 and 1/16 should cover most anything exhaust related
    Thank you! I put that information in the first post.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    California.
    Posts
    738

    Default

    The best way to sharpening the tungsten is to use the front face of a bench grinder and you will want to point the tungsten upward so the grain from grinding it will be going lengthwise on the electrode. This helps direct the flow of electricity.
    If you use the sides of a bench grinder you can eventually wear a groove in the wheel which can cause the mass outside of the grooves radius to break off.

    When you are trying to weld two pieces of aluminum with a gap then you will need to connect them by adding rod to both sides simultaneously, or just by building up each side. Your rod will ball up a bit on the end because of the alternating current, so if that is all that is happening when you say it's melting into the cup, then just pull the tungsten out more.

    And for the exhaust, fusing will be perfectly fine because it's not load bearing, all it does is direct the exhaust fumes.
    You will want to add rod on most parts that will be under load, or will be experiencing some sort of force.

    Stainless steel is a great material to learn tig on because it will tell you everything you are doing after you are finished with the weld.

    If it's shiny and very colorful then you got the heat and speed right.
    If it's dark and matte then it was either too hot or too slow.

    I can also help anybody trying to tig through pm.

    I weld aluminum chassis for electronics in helicopters and satellites, and I also do lot's of stainless racks, so those are kinda my specialties haha.

  18. #43

    Default

    ^Good info.

    I fuse most of my exhaust, but remember that even if it's not load bearing it has to hold its own weight, engine flex, (heat) contraction, and all the other variables that it will face (lowered cars....). Basically do some good brackets and you can get away with a lot in regards to exhaust if you're N/A.

  19. #44

    Default

    Screw TIG, damn I'm in love!

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF1Srs_e1Aw"]How good is your TIG weld? (weld strength & oxy acetylene torch welding aluminum) - YouTube[/ame]

    I need to learn this. Like now.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Great info as always, Shea! Thank you. Some of that stuff is going into the first post.


    Good points, Heist. I'll keep those in mind.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UTAH
    Posts
    129

    Default

    That would actually be incorrect.

    I've been welding for 14 years now. I've used Flux and MIG, Stick and Gas.

    Flux burns hotter and gets better penetration then MIG.

    MIG looks prettier. FLUX looks ugly if you can't figure it out.

    MIG works great in nearly all types of welding, and will penetrate really well with a good machine.

    FLUX can be used with shielding gas for some awesome welds. I've made some beautiful welds using shielding gas with FLUX.

    Learn how to control your speed and watch your puddle. Get a good machine. Get a good Helmet. Metal prep. These are the keys to good welds.

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ire-selection/

    Quote Originally Posted by mrg7243 View Post
    Yeah, the problem is you dont get great penetration with flux, and they usually dont look that clean.

  22. #47

    Default

    You guys need to consult with this expert: http://www.stanceworks.com/forums/sh...=polo+bodydrop

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    That's your first post? An insult in a thread that clearly says not to do so? Come on, man. Be nice. Go start in the Intro Thread.
    Last edited by M.Doban; 02-26-2014 at 05:40 PM.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

  24. #49

    Default

    I've read conflicting arguments over this, but what are the professionals opinion on MIG welding and having it look like "a stack of dimes"? This is how I generally weld. Some people say it is weaker, others say it is just as strong as a continuous bead. Some people say it's a failure waiting to happen, while one guy I found who fabricates Baja racing truck suspension components has been using the technique for ten plus years and has had zero failures. I'm a big fan of leaving welds visible, show off that hard work and skill instead of grinding it all smooth, so I like my stuff to look good as well as being structurally sound. Opinions?

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    890

    Default

    When I first got into MIG welding like 5 years ago, I did the dime stacking thing. It was too hard for me to get a bead to look pretty.

    However, I am now able to make a bead look like a stack of dimes so I only use the tack-tack-tack method for thin stuff.

    Nevertheless, the stuff I welded 5 years ago is still holding up today (particularly my front crossmember which has withstood 5 years of drag launches). The tacking method works, but you don't get the same penetration as a bead. It seems to be enough penetration though. That being said I prefer a bead.
    Last edited by M.Doban; 07-10-2015 at 11:03 AM.

    Instagram: surpriseitsmicah

    Builds:

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •