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Thread: The car wash guide

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    London England
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    Default The car wash guide

    The safest practise to swirl free washing

    The wash guide takes you step by step through the proper process of simply washing your car. Or is it so simple?

    These guides are not intended to be set in store concrete instructions, we as a company and my self as an individual understand different people will have different techniques to attain the desired end result, thats cool, and we want your input, as what works for one might not necessarily work for another.




    Pre rinse

    This stage is often rushed but it is one of the most important parts of the process for freeing up loose dirt and silt, driving it out of panel gaps so they donít get caught in your wash mitt/sponge and cause marring. If you have access to a pressure washer or hose then work from the top down, rinsing the panels carefully. Pay particular attention to panel gaps and regions, which may trap dirt (inside roof rails for example) and rinse these out thoroughly. If you do not have access to a hose or pressure washer, donít worry! Grab a watering can and put the rose on it and use this to rinse the car as thoroughly as possible. Expect this stage to take a good quarter of an hour if done correctly Ė you really want to focus on removing as much loose dirt as you can from traps so that it doesnít get caught in your mitt later on. Donít use high-pressure water if using your pressure washer as this could drive dirt into the paint causing marring.




    Pre foam

    This stage requires a pressure washer with foam lance (ideally) or a special hose attachment known as a Gilmour Foamster. The purpose of the pre-foam is to remove more of the grime on the paintwork without needing to touch it with a wash mitt or sponge. The action of the foam lifts the dirt and allows it to slide off of the paintwork in a lubricated solution to avoid marring the paint. The less damage that is induced during the wash stage, the longer your car will look at its best! When applying the foam to the car, do so methodically. Itís a bit like colouring in a picture; you don't need repetitive applications over the same area. Start on one side and from the roof down apply the foam with slow sweeping motions of the lance (side to side or up and down). Once the car is fully covered leave the foam to dwell for a few minutes before rinsing it off. When rinsing, rinse from the bottom to the top. This agitates the foam on the lower area where the majority of the dirt is, rather than watering it down from above. If you don't have access to a foam lance, do not worry. Although this step is preferable it is not essential to mar-free washing.




    Two bucket wash

    Often considered the major stage of the washing process, this is where you physically wash the paint using a wash mitt/sponge and shampoo solution. Fill one bucket with fresh water - this is your rinsing bucket. Fill a second bucket about 3/4 full with water then add shampoo and stir. Add enough shampoo to make the mixture feel slick. Then top up the bucket until full. Start at the top and work your way down. Saturate your wash mitt in shampoo solution and with only very light pressure, sweep the mitt gently from side to side to remove the dirt. Squeeze the water out of the mitt on the paint and then wipe backwards and forwards gently ensuring you use plenty of shampoo solution. Never increase the pressure - stubborn marks may just need extra time. Before putting the wash mitt back into the shampoo solution, rinse it thoroughly in the rinse bucket. If you are using a lambs wool mitt, run your fingers through the pile of the mitt to release trapped dirt. Once the mitt is thoroughly cleaned, go back to the shampoo bucket and continue working around the car in this way until complete. Leave the dirtiest areas such as lower parts of doors and the boot-lid and rear bumper until last.




    Rinsing

    This stage can either be done as you wash (panel per panel, recommended on a hot and sunny day) or after fully washing the whole car. If using a pressure washer or a hose, set this to give a steady stream of water. Rinse from the top down using plenty of water allowing it to sheet off of the paintwork. On your car that has been recently detailed and protected with a wax or sealant the rinse water will sheet off the paintwork leaving it looking nearly dry. If this sheeting process slows down after a few weeks, it will be necessary to top up the protection on the paint Ė see later section. If you don't have access to a pressure washer or a hose, then you can use a watering can without a rose to rinse the car from the top down as above. Expect to need at least five full watering cans to rinse a small car.




    Drying

    The drying stage is important to take particular care over, as this is where a lot of paint damage can be inflicted. The use of a water blade for example, while effective at drying, can cause scratches in the paintwork if only the smallest piece of grit blow down onto the paint while you are drying! Such damage will require further machine polishing to remove. When drying a car it is best to proceed methodically and gently. Start at the top and work your way down. Using a microfiber drying towel or chamois (well cared for!) gently wipe the surface dry using no pressure. You may also wish to pat the surface dry rather than wipe to minimise the chances of inflicting marring. A further option is to spray a quick detailer onto the rinsed paintwork, which will add a small amount of lubrication and help prevent the towel from marring the paintwork.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Default

    I'd like to add, don't forget to clean off wiper blades. It's a little detail but they trap grime and can cause nasty smears on your nice, clean glass.

    Speaking of glass, any recommendations for a nice streak free shine on windows? Also, for vehicles with chrome or metal trim on the exterior, what's the best way to get them shining and stay that way?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    London England
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeyRa View Post
    I'd like to add, don't forget to clean off wiper blades. It's a little detail but they trap grime and can cause nasty smears on your nice, clean glass.

    Speaking of glass, any recommendations for a nice streak free shine on windows? Also, for vehicles with chrome or metal trim on the exterior, what's the best way to get them shining and stay that way?
    Good tip.

    As for a good smear free glass cleaner, you should try our Crystal glass cleaner, honestly it is very very good, but dont just take my word for it, bash it in to google and you will see plenty of good reviews of it from lots of people on all sorts of specialist car care forums etc.

    James

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Albany Ga
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    Default

    Nice Tips! Gotta use


    So you Fancy Huh!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Sugar Land, Tx
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    18

    Default

    Any tips on cleaning aluminum or chrome lips?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    London England
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by k0ntr0lledka0s View Post
    Any tips on cleaning aluminum or chrome lips?
    Just take it easy, just use car wash soap (no strong cleaners) the best advise would be clean and polish them to perfection then seal them with a dedicated wheel or metal selant to make future cleaning easy.

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