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Thread: Resizing in Photoshop

  1. #1
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    Default Resizing in Photoshop

    Does anyone have advice on how to make an image smaller in PS (CS3) without losing sharpness?

    Right now, I simply choose the new size constraints with Scale Styles, Constrain Proportions, and Resample Image enabled (with Bicubic Sharper selected), and then just mess around with the Unsharpen Mask once the image is reduced. I've seen several online video tutorials, but they've all covered the same points, and I continue getting unsatisfactory results. What am I missing?

    Also, whenever I "Save for Web & Devices" in order to convert a RAW file to a JPEG in order to upload an image to Flickr, the colors seem to get washed out, any reason for this?
    Last edited by boligrafo123; 11-24-2009 at 11:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    You won't lose sharpness when you make an image smaller. Why go through all those extra steps? Just use Image > Image Size. Also NEVER use save for web unless it is for a button or something. Using that function for a photograph will ruin everything. If you want the colors to be more accurate to what you see in PS, un-check the box that says "Use Adobe (RGB) 1998" or whatever it says in the "Save" dialog.
    Dylan Leff - www.originalplate.com

  3. #3

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    agreed. if anything use the unsharpen mask a bit. but don't 'save for web' just hit 'save as' and choose jpeg and keep your quality all the way up.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the help, guys.

  5. #5
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    good call on save for web. no wonder my shit looks nasty

  6. #6

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    also, depending on what browser you're using, some colors will end up looking different. i always make sure to check embed sRGB profile so that my pictures will end up looking the same on most browsers. mojocoggo is right, make sure to uncheck the Adobe RGB profile thing.

  7. Default

    You might consider getting a program such as Lightroom if you are doing a lot of images. LightRoom 2.5 is awesome.

    From what I've found FireFox makes all images look like crap. I can see a huge difference in quality between FF and Safari.

  8. #8

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    The reason you see differences in different browsers is that FF ignores embedded color profiles. If you want color consistency between browsers (chrome, safari, opera, IE, FF, even konqueror at this point) make sure the file's profile is "sRGB", this is what most browsers expect to see when there is an image displayed without an embedded profile (or if it completely ignores it, FF style).

    use sRGB for now, untill all browsers support embedded color profiles by default.

  9. #9
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    So I'm having issues with the colors seeming unsaturated after saving from RAW to a jpeg still. I saved it normally(not for web) and unchecked the RGB 1998 box. I tried all save modes(Optimized standard, Progressive, etc) in the highest quality, and no matter what, to colors are no where NEAR as vibrant as on PS. Help!

    I also seem to get better quality(still not great, but better than just saving normally as jpeg) when I save to web.
    Last edited by B Rod; 12-02-2009 at 09:38 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by B Rod View Post
    colors are no where NEAR as vibrant as on PS.
    In which program?
    Dylan Leff - www.originalplate.com

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by B Rod View Post
    So I'm having issues with the colors seeming unsaturated after saving from RAW to a jpeg still. I saved it normally(not for web) and unchecked the RGB 1998 box. I tried all save modes(Optimized standard, Progressive, etc) in the highest quality, and no matter what, to colors are no where NEAR as vibrant as on PS. Help!

    I also seem to get better quality(still not great, but better than just saving normally as jpeg) when I save to web.
    Just unchecking that box doesn't force it to be sRGB. i'm assuming you're using photoshop, which uses ACR to convert the raw. Do all the normal edits you would to the raw file (exposure, saturation, vibrancy, etc etc) and bring it into Photoshop. Now you need to go to "convert to profile" (I think thats what its called, dont have PS on this laptop), and change it to sRGB, and save your file normally (not save for web). You wont see a difference on the screen, but it should look better in a browser/email. Photoshop likes to default to Adobe1998 or whatever its called. Lightroom likes to use ProphotoRGB as the default
    Last edited by Pank; 12-03-2009 at 02:45 AM.

  12. #12

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    For better color, i would just adjust the colors back to what it was by messing with the hues and levels. your monitor can display / support alot more colors than a web browser can. that may be one of the causes that you are loosing color.

    also, if you are saving for web, try 96 dpi instead of 72 dpi. file size will be a bit larger, but alot sharper.

  13. #13

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    good to know about the 96dpi. A photo will always look better as a .raw file compared to a jpeg. uncompressed>compressed always.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Junktion View Post
    For better color, i would just adjust the colors back to what it was by messing with the hues and levels. your monitor can display / support alot more colors than a web browser can. that may be one of the causes that you are loosing color.

    also, if you are saving for web, try 96 dpi instead of 72 dpi. file size will be a bit larger, but alot sharper.
    Both of these are kind of bad information :\
    The washed out colors are due to a color space issue, adjusting "hues and levels" has nothing to do with it.
    a web browser can actually display MORE colors than your monitor can.

    DPI literally changes nothing when displayed on a computer, its only used for printing.

    http://apptools.com/examples/dpi.php

    changing it will not affect sharpness at all

    also:

    Quote Originally Posted by Neb View Post
    A photo will always look better as a .raw file compared to a jpeg. uncompressed>compressed always.
    Thats not really true either, a RAW is literally the raw data from the image sensor from the camera. Its either a 10 or 12 or 14 bit (depending on camera) image. Your monitor can only really display 8 bits of information. The RAW image you see inside your raw converter is just that, "converted" to display on your 8 bit monitor. You cannot view a raw file at its native bit depth on a normal computer monitor.
    The reason i say this, is because jpgs are an 8bit image file
    Last edited by Pank; 12-03-2009 at 10:43 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mojocoggo View Post
    In which program?
    Irfanview, Windows Image View, Photobucket, etc. They all end up looking the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pank View Post
    Just unchecking that box doesn't force it to be sRGB. i'm assuming you're using photoshop, which uses ACR to convert the raw. Do all the normal edits you would to the raw file (exposure, saturation, vibrancy, etc etc) and bring it into Photoshop. Now you need to go to "convert to profile" (I think thats what its called, dont have PS on this laptop), and change it to sRGB, and save your file normally (not save for web). You wont see a difference on the screen, but it should look better in a browser/email. Photoshop likes to default to Adobe1998 or whatever its called. Lightroom likes to use ProphotoRGB as the default
    I did actually do that, after reading into it a bit more.

  16. Default

    how to make an image smaller in PS (CS3) without losing sharpness?

    Steps

    1. Make a copy of the image you want to resize. ...
    2. Right-click the image's copy. ...
    3. Select Open with. ...
    4. Click Paint. ...
    5. Click Resize. ...
    6. Make sure "Percentage" has a black dot next to it. ...
    7. Check the "Maintain aspect ratio" box. ...
    8. Resize your image.

  17. #17

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    You can follow alter the image size and compression option. There are a few functions in the Save for web window to pay attention to. Getting the best way to reduce the file size of your images while maintaining quality depends on your specific requirements. There is no one-size-fits-all option here.

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