Automotive Enthusiasm is not mutually exclusive

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-August 30, 2013-

Automotive Enthusiasm is not mutually exclusive

Andrew Ritter

There was a time when most of us hummed car noises while scooting small diecast cars across the kitchen floor. There were toy boxes filled with all sorts of matchbox vehicles. From a bass-boat finished C3 Corvette with shiny pipes out the side, to a car-crushing monster truck sitting atop gnarled tires, the collections were as diverse as it gets. Little metal dump trucks shared space with racecars, fire trucks, and sports cars alike. I’m certain we all had a favorite that displayed our love in the form of faded colors and chips, but on any given day, each of the cars and trucks held a role in the imaginary scenarios that played out on the carpets of our living rooms. As young children, if a vehicle had wheels and made loud noises, it awoke something in us that caused us to tug at our parents’ arms in excitement. Whether passing a construction site, wandering the aisles of a classic car show, or sitting on a hill overlooking the race track, we found unexplainable joy in automobiles of all makes and models. So the question arises, when does all of this change? What causes people to feel obligated to narrow their minds and choose sides?  Why is there such tension between the various genres of automotive enthusiasm?

Somewhere along the way, as we age, people begin to segregate the car world and put up walls. Rules are developed about what’s “cool” at the time and cars are lumped into categories, further dividing the community. “Shoulds” and “Should nots” are repeated across web forums as members explain to others how they ought to enjoy their own cars. Euro guys bash JDM guys while track enthusiasts patronize stance enthusiasts. It’s as if, with age, we all receive a declaration that the lines are drawn and we are obligated to choose sides. People pick a style and pledge their undying allegiance to it, putting on blinders and forging ahead certain that their style is the “right” one. Before you know it, people are putting down fellow enthusiasts simply for enjoying their cars in a manner divergent from their own with an air of superiority. They toss around tired internet clichés like “You’re doing it wrong” or “Epic Fail” to establish that their way of doing things is the only true “right” way.

Of course, this is not to say that everyone falls into this trap, and certainly no side is any less guilty than the other, but that’s the problem. This is a matter that is prevalent enough to pervade all realms of the car world and cause tension throughout. It’s important that we take a moment and reflect on the bigger picture: you don’t have to pick a side. There is no reason to limit your car enthusiasm to any single style, purpose, or brand. You can appreciate cars built for function while still applauding the beauty of a car built with form in mind. While you might prefer to dial in the stance of your car, take a moment to bask in the impressive nature of race car engineering and performance. Re-establish that excitement that you had as a child with no bias or prejudice. Open your mind to the wealth of inspiration that lies beyond the niche that you’ve found yourself in. Explore the other styles that are out there and realize that they all hold a value of their own.

Too often I read the statement, “You’ve ruined your car” as someone seeks to demean another car owner for modifying their car in a slightly different fashion from their own. To "ruin" means to destroy or cause irreparable damage - a car is ruined in the unfortunate occurrence of automobile accidents when it meets its demise and parts lay strewn out amidst puddles of oil and coolant. A car is ruined if it’s left to rot away in a field or barn, unloved and uncared for. It’s unfair and rude to claim that someone has ruined their car when they dump their blood and sweat into their build. Whether or not you agree with the style or purpose with which someone modifies their car, the reality is that the owner truly cares about their car and they’re pouring their passion into it. Regardless of the style, that car is one that is loved. It’s being used and enjoyed as it was meant to be.

In these battles, you often hear “shoulds” thrown about insinuating that there’s only one correct way to enjoy your car. There’s a general misconception that behind every car lays an intrinsic purpose or function that we ought to abide by. Perhaps you’ll read that S2000s should only be modified for performance because that’s what they were intended for, or that you shouldn’t dive into a 500hp engine build on your Volkswagen because it was meant to be a FWD commuter car. You shouldn’t body-drop your truck because trucks are meant to carry heavy loads, and you shouldn’t lower your Subaru because it was designed to be used as a rally car. The list of "shoulds" is endless and it goes against what it means to be a car enthusiast.

The reality is that cars are not developed with one sole purpose in mind. Car designers are given the task to develop a car that is going to sell. Performance, style, comfort, safety, and reliability are seen as marketing tools to promote their product and encourage buyers to purchase their car over their competitors’. Each car developer balances these factors to best meet the needs of their target customers. If a car were truly designed solely for performance you wouldn’t find yourself with AC, sound deadening, reclinable seats, or navigation. If a car were simply about style, car companies wouldn’t employ large teams of engineers who work day in and day out to produce high horsepower engines and nimble suspension. Cars are a balance of form and function. Some brands will sacrifice a bit of comfort to deliver a fast sportscar and others will sacrifice a bit of performance to build a comfortable luxury car, but at the end of the day, these cars are built to bring enjoyment to their future owners. For those of us who have chosen car building as a hobby, cars are an empty canvas with no pre-defined direction. They are simply meant to be enjoyed in any way you know how.

So let’s shed these imaginary guidelines and misconceptions. There are no rules. There is no right or wrong way to enjoy your car as long as it’s bringing you joy.  Open your mind to the other styles and learn to appreciate them for what they are. Talk to other owners and develop an understanding of where they’re coming from. Take a moment to drool over a show car and a moment to listen as a racecar screams its way down the back straightaway. Don’t limit yourself to any single segment of the automotive world. We all may prefer different styles, but we’re not that different. We’re all excited by four-wheel gas guzzling machines and it’s because of this shared loved that we should all treat each other with respect and applaud each others’ accomplishments.

 

 

 

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51 comments
BrianCollins
BrianCollins

You guys are awesome. As someone whos been in the ("tuner", "slammed", "modified" whatever you want to call it), scene for the last 18 years (Im 36). I think the scene as far as style and performance is better then ever, the people in the scene however, are the worst Ive ever seen. Your article and you, as enthusiasts, have your finger on the pulse of everything that is awesome in this scene and have the attitude that everyone should share. Ive always loved this site because I feel like the viewers on your forum are more mature, more accepting of different styles, and more helpful then any others ive ever dealt with.  I love the fact that youll feature rat rod with a BMW motor one week, a Civic hatch another week, and then do a profile on the history of BMW 2002s. Keep it up guys, youre one of the only sites I actually check daily because I look forward to seeing what direction youre going in that week. Everyone in the scene needs to read this article and learn something!

KevinTam
KevinTam

Really enjoyed reading the article and the photos. Love your intro paragraph to it all.

JohnTruitt
JohnTruitt

Have you guys done any articles on lifted trucks? I love slammed cars/trucks as well as ones that are used on the circuit, but I personally drive a Jeep Wrangler with a 4" lift running on 34's, and I cant get enough of lifted gasser/diesel trucks either. I think it would be cool for you guys to venture out into that scene mostly because a lifted truck that's stanced out almost means the same thing as a stanced out S2k or Miata. They both use spacers and the amount of wheel-gap is very important lol. Seriously though, I think it would be worth it for you guys to do some articles on some nice ass trucks. I saw a youtube video of a lifted Ram 2500 diesel spank a GTR. Whether the driver in the Nissan couldn't drive or what, I don't know, but I laughed my ass off watching Godzilla get beat by a lifted truck. Like you guys said, keep an open mind :P

JasonCarroll
JasonCarroll

I just like cars, and trucks and bikes. build what you want, how you want just do it safe and do a good quality job on the build.

Jason Headsetsdotcom
Jason Headsetsdotcom

As with everything in life, do what makes you happy, not what you think will make other people happy.

BagRidersJohn
BagRidersJohn

Absolutely beautiful article. In my honest opinion, there isn't a single person in the automotive world that wouldn't benefit from reading this fine piece of literature, and the self-reflecting that occurs shortly thereafter. I feel you did a spectacular job in drawing the line between merely indifferent statements such as "Not my style" or "Meh", juxtaposed to aggressive declarations along the lines of "Way to ruin your rally car" (not speaking from personal experience, or anything!). Thank you for another great read!

MarkOstrowski
MarkOstrowski

This is the best article on the site. period.

JDMKAR
JDMKAR

Amazing article. I prefer form over function. But when I see a really clean stanced car, whether it be a Civic, or a Hyundai Genesis. No matter what it is, I respect that. I'd love to have a nice drift car and a show car that is stanced. They're both completely opposite and I love them both. I strongly dislike old muscle cars, and newer muscle cars. Mostly because of the guys that own them have ZERO respect for import guys, whether it be European cars or Japanese.. I will never be a part of that hatred. If I see a cleanly built muscle car, I respect it. 

If you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all. That saying goes for cars as well.

stayshift
stayshift

Excellent proclamation of automotive unity but he skirts the issue of doing things with a sense of taste and design aesthetic that isn't just pleasant to the owner. Like the Bill of Rights, there are universal truths in design and some people throw them out the door just because they want to be "different." There is a right and wrong of doing walking this line and a few have found the formula to be too complex and they rally the general populace in hating them. It may be that beauty is in the eye of the beholder but RWB and Magnus Walker and Smoky Nagato and Isami Amemiya and Ferruccio Lamborghini, seemed to do their own thing when all others were hating it. The difference between them and the kid down the street with the unpainted bumpers, sticker shock, and bum ass wheels? You just read it. 

tittymcgee
tittymcgee

I personally drive a BMW 740i Msport and i think Audi and Mercedes drivers are below me. its just a friendly rivalry. i really appreciate all brands of cars but there will always be brand rivalry and thats what makes cars so great.

stfu1
stfu1

Another one of these articles. The preference in a specific "niche" vehicle is the same as having the preference to begin with.  People build cars to their tastes with their money, therefore they are entitled to favor cars to their tastes to another.  And as cliche as it is, its also their right to voice what they would like.  They are not in the wrong for saying how they would build it if it was theirs, just like the person who built the car their way is not in the wrong for doing it their way.  Call it hate or call it an opinion, either way its the same its just dependent on the receiving end on how they translate it. 

 

I personally have absolutely no care for the cars that have insane camber with tires stretched over an oversized rim.  This also depends on the car, if its a Honda, who really cares.  If its a 911, why?? People write articles like this and then they are also the first to flame a rapper who throws giant bling bling wheels on a Ferrari - THE CAR WAS NOT ENGINEERED FOR THAT!!! But it is okay when someone else throws vintage HRE wheels on it and slams it to the ground....

 

The problem with the "haters" is not preference, its actually automotive intelligence.  The way a car looks is just a quarter of the overall car.  The rest of it is the engineering.  Cars are made to perform, but we take them and make them a "canvas" forgetting that the same car was not engineered to have insane negative camber and bottom out over every speed bump.  Then when you are stranded at a show because you ripped off your oil pan, next thing you know the car is being blamed for "poor build quality." Be real.

 

Show cars are generally trailered for a reason, because they are so damn extravagant and have reversed every bit of engineering that they are not road worthy cars.  Is there anything wrong with that? No.  Because if you are a true enthusiast you know the difference between a daily driver, a show car, a track car, etc.  You can tastefully modify a daily driver and still leave it road worthy.  You can tastefully modify an exotic without destroying its soul (how it was engineered).

 

Let go of the "hater" crap and start promoting automotive education.  Stop pushing this bill that we should not voice our opinions and that we should like whatever it that someone thought up in their head.  Start analyzing the car, compare the modifications to what was engineered. I imagine about 99% of the people here would flame a Ford GT500 with Lamborghini doors, a Gallardo with a giant aftermarket spoiler, a RSX with 22s and gaudy bodykit or a Skyline with a LSX swap.

Biss
Biss

This article is an absolute work of art. What a beautiful read. This acceptance problem is prevalent in all areas of the internet nowadays, So thank you for reminding us that we really all love the same thing.

Maccario69
Maccario69

Different strokes for different folks so take off your blinkers and appreciate everything around you. You will be amazed at the tips & tricks you pick up once you stop looking for whats wrong and start looking for whats right.

Great article SW, keep it coming.

Bruce Bedrick
Bruce Bedrick

Understanding is evolving i think this article is a turning point for SW and hopefully a large portion of the scene, its not about if your into stance, power, racing, drifting, it dosent matter.  Its STRICTLY taking the love, effort , and clear passion put into a car, and weather or not you agree with it . Overall as a enthusiast understanding the point of view and respecting what was put on the table. Weather or not the budget is small large, 500 dollars or 500,000 dollars, enthusiasts are all about making what they drive there own, something different from the rest, something they can park in the garage at the end of the night and turn back and look at and say "im happy thats mine." I love and respect this article especially coming from a strong site in the current scene. People forget that there is always room to grow , there is always room to improve, and always room to appreciate, just because what you have is the "in fad" dosen't make someone being different bad, all love, and all is equal.  Of course pieces will be preferred to others but end of the day the car community is a family we should all have eachothers backs, reciprocate and appreciate that is life that is cars that is what this about. Thank you stance works thank you.

ajnardo
ajnardo

their car, their money. 

Blackumi
Blackumi

This article was a great read. Often times, people forget that no matter what flavor you like, it all comes out of the same popsicle factory. With the flavor being style, and the factory being the love of the automobile. I spend a good amount of time on social networking sites, and it amazes me to see how many people have begun to nitpick at even the slightest "unsatisfactory" modification to ones car. I mean seriously, calling someones car stupid because of their sticker placement??? Give me a damn break and stop the trashing. 

 

This article needs to be posted on a wall somewhere for all to see.

iRACECAR
iRACECAR

there is a very fine line between a labor of love and polishing (or creating) a turd, and like porn, you know it when you see it. this article reads like some kind of eloquently written stoner dream, about a world where people don't take a can of aircraft remover and a baseball bat to their brand new car in an attempt to look cool. i have nothing but respect for someone who is obviously enthusiastic about their vehicle, whatever it may be, but very little for those who are more in love with the idea of impressing others. 

MHaber9
MHaber9

Great article, Its not that rare that a buddy of mine get in this same debate over things like that,even so detailed as the brand of the classic euro or the model of the classic truck

mxrz
mxrz

No side is any less guilty than the other? Wrong. If you look at the bigger picture, there are only two sides: Those that modify and personalize their cars without compromising their safety and road worthiness, and the side that does whatever they fancy, with a damn all safety and regulations attitude. Fact is, in American especially, people can get away with doing all kinds of stupid shit to their cars. I bet if you take all these stance cars to Germany and tried to register and pass inspection, the TUV would throw out 60% of them for not being road worthy. And that's how it's possible to ruin a car, and it has nothing to do with taste and personal preference, it has everything to do with respect.

 

Heavily tinted tails, 55watt blue/purple low beams, overstretched tires, out of spec wheel alignment and suspension geometry... that's not style, that's not personal taste, that's lack of respect, lack of mechanical knowledge and disregard towards safety...

KeithOT
KeithOT

I'm not really arguing it is an interesting article & yes I have built my own car & modified probably 25 odd cars in my  nearly 50 years of driving I do classic shows these days I use to compete in Classic off road trials in various Volkswagens & a Porsche 91, so tend to modify cars to suit my use I'm not into Concours but appreciate those that are. I even modified the engine of my first 'car' a Messerschmitt KR200 to increase the horsepower & that has been my main interest over the years. If you want to drop a car into the weeds OK but my question was how do you drive it on todays roads. My car a Jaguar XK replica  has a ground clearance of 3 1/2" & that is low enough to mean I can't use about 30% of local roads & have to be careful travelling anywhere speed humps & potholes can bar me from driving some roads or having to accept dragging my exhaust or damaging radius arm mounts on these traffic calming or poorly maintained roads.  So how do these very low cars get on or are they trailered to events?

Mike Greenburg
Mike Greenburg

This article is interesting.. As I agree with the general statement that's being made. It's quite the Change of tone for SW. The same folks that in past articles have made strong and bias statements abt "trends".. this being same site that helped "popularize" The Slanted stickers, colored wheels, etc etc. The same group of folks talk trash abt good ppl doing good things (one of many examples being John Ludwick Jr). Strongly passing judgement about someone expressing hatred for no reason. Does SW forget abt its large audience? Or much less use precaution when posting such horrible things on social media? Does SW understand it has a responsibility to its followers/supporters to be good role models? Especially after such a article and its currently growth and popularity.. How the folks in At BMW would support a group like this is beyond MOST ppls understanding. Perhaps SW should take a good look in the mirror before professing that they want to be a part of something that brings ppl together. Your newer/younger audience would be amazed at the amount of hypocrisy over the lifespan of SW. SW has been one of the largest catalyst for creating such segregation within certain groups. But most are blinded by the pretty pictures and the current fad thats taken over the car scene. I will say that not all of those within the SW family behaves like this. Sadly the very one person that shouldn't, does and could clearly care less abt it. Perhaps this maybe a turning point for SW? SW is largely consider by most as a fad now. Sadly before it was something really special. Hopefully stance works is growing up and really wants to be something that's truly respected. Respect is vastly different that being considered cool or popular..All the best to SW either way. There is always room for change. And many would like to see that.

NPTCB
NPTCB

Lowering an old classic Mercedes like that is the equivalent of ordering a $150 dry aged steak at a nice restaurant and pouring ketchup all over it. There is just no arguing bad taste.

KeithOT
KeithOT

All I can say is my car has 3 1/2" of ground clearance & that bars me from about 30% of my local roads & I have to be careful where I travel elsewhere in the country we have these wretched speed humps in the roads & also poorly maintained roads with pot holes. You must have pool table flat roads or can you raise the car hydraulically for road driving? Yes I can see the hard & skilled work that goes into creating the whole 'look' of the cars I wouldn't want my hard work ruined by tearing the exhaust/floor/suspension out of it on a public road. I like to hear from an owner how they cope with this type of problem.

jayare
jayare

More modern american muscle pictures  :)

JustinOdijk
JustinOdijk

We shouldn't even be arguing about this , i mean i go to stance shows , f1 , gt races , classic shows and many more automotive events , as a car lover hou should love every car but you can love one thing more than another and i understand some people don't like cars lyong one inch of the ground but you don't have to drive it and if you really don't like it don't visit stance show and sites

KeithTurner
KeithTurner

Modifying is great & a personal thing but lowering a road car to within an inch of the ground is to render it almost undriveable on many 'modern' potholed roads or over speed humps so loved here in UK & much of Europe. We use to lower cars a few inches to improve roadholding but the latest trends are frankly daft & to my eyes don't look good look like the are in a junkyard with collapsed suspension.

Euro Only
Euro Only

Just because I like certain cars, does not mean I am obligated to like others just because they are cars. The problem with the car communities today is the "Publicity" that these "scene" people crave, and are willing to hack up a car, paint the wheels a funny color, and show up at a 1 Make show with not that make looking for attention. And the internet just feeds these guys with this crap, and the me-too's then start to copy and replicate the blight. 

You want to stop the tension, Stop Making Stupid People Famous. Try doing more features on cars that are actually built. not Air ride and wheels.  (Asking a lot from a Stance site, but worth it) Give the real builders and engineers who make the aftermarket community the respect and attention THEY deserve, not these wanna be garage, T Shirt Companies fake posing as garages and stance blogs recycling the same low car photos over and over again. 

dare23
dare23

Hopefully you open some minds.  Great article.

William
William

True stuff said above.

brony
brony

stance sucks

7Tune
7Tune

 @stfu1 I was going to comment at length but don't see the need now as you've absolutely nailed it. The article was good but raises more questions than it answers and the overall logic is flawed.There is a reason the entire planet and everything in it operates on a form follows function basis. How is this so hard to understand for car enthusiasts? Education indeed...

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

 @stfu1 I made no suggestion in the article that opinions should not be shared. This, of course, would be a silly request as it would lead to a community where discussions could never be had in the first place. I think people have every right to "voice what they would like" as you say. There is a large divide between sharing an opinion such as "I like this" and "I don't like that" versus declarations such as "You've ruined your car." or something of the sorts. An opinion states a person's feelings towards the subject matter, the latter attempts to make value statements about the subject matter itself. This is the breakdown between subjective and objective statements. Objective values are defined entirely independent of the viewer. It's irrational to think that you can take a subjective opinion and use it to make claims about objective values. The rest of your comment is structured on your personal perspective on what was originally intended by the engineers of the car. This was addressed in the article.

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

The topic that you're hinting at is craftsmanship which was not discussed in the article because it's a separate topic from style. Craftsmanship is the manner or quality with which styles are executed. We agree that craftsmanship is a very important factor in builds. 

TaylorMenezes
TaylorMenezes

Freedom: An excuse to do stupid things, even when you know they're stupid.

AmericaMan
AmericaMan

The idea of not caring about what other people have to say about your car, simply doing what you think is cool, is what started the whole stance movement. Somewhere along the line, somebody took their car to the shop, said "make it lower, I don't care how difficult it is" and that is what made the whole site, let alone the stance community happen. I think, with articles like this, ones that say stance is whatever you want it to be, this website and it's administrators are telling the readers that they are opening their doors to more readers, more varied opinions, and cars you might never see anywhere else. That's the kind of change I want to see. On this site, I think its nothing new anyway.

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

Mike,Thank you for taking the time to share your points. StanceWorks has been around for about 4 years now and there's no denying that things have changed greatly over the span of those years. It's natural for people, organizations, trends, and car communities to grow, evolve, and mature with time as they open their minds with new experiences. I look back on my own personal taste in cars since I was a kid and I can see a maturing and expansion of my tastes as I've grown older and I believe that many would say the same thing. As you meet new people, experience new things, learn about others' perspectives, you grow as a person. StanceWorks is a labor of passion for us, so as our tastes change and our perspectives broaden, it's natural that StanceWorks will grow and evolve alongside us. -Andrew Ritter (the author)By all means, if you ever want to talk about this further or ask any questions, my email is always open and I thoroughly enjoy discussing these matters with fellow enthusiasts. andrew (at) StanceWorks (dot) com 

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

But if someone prefers to coat their steak in ketchup rather than Béarnaise sauce, who's to say there's anything "wrong" with that? It's simply a different taste. 

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

 @KeithOT Keith,There are different ways of coping with the problems ranging from adjustable suspension (airride or hydraulics) to physically raising the parts that might cause clearance issues such as the oil pain or exhaust. Additionally, a little extra care is taken in navigating speedbumps and potholes. You certainly sacrifice some of the "ease" of daily driving in exchange for the desired look, but in many cases car modification is a balance of sacrifices. In the same way, performance car builders may sacrifice a bit of comfort when they remove Air Conditioning or factory seats for weight saving purposes. Let me know if you have any more questions. We're always happy to share.

 

stfu1
stfu1

110% agree with this quote "You want to stop the tension, Stop Making Stupid People Famous."

 

Real enthusiasts understand cars, understand the scene and will keep to themselves.  You may get a slight percent who will make comments along the lines of "that's stupid" but again, they are entitled to that.  That does not mean they have "misconceptions" and need to "give it a chance."

 

Stop giving credits to those who constantly bash everything out there out of pure jealously and start giving credit to those who are legitimate enthusiasts.

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

No one is suggesting that you are OBLIGATED to like other styles, but I am suggesting that you respect others' personal tastes even if they differ from yours. Perhaps you don't particularly like their wheel color choice, but that's no reason to patronize them. At the end of the day, they are enjoying their cars just as you are....they're simply doing so in another manner. You can convince yourself that so-called "scene people" are doing it for all the wrong reasons, but that's nothing more than an assumption on your part. Don't be so quick to judge fellow enthusiasts. If you don't feel that StanceWorks applauds the real builders and engineers, I suggest you spend a bit of time really diving into our blog. You'll find cars that are just suspension and wheels because we feel that the "little guys" deserve a bit of spotlight of their own, but you'll also find plenty of high-end builds, companies, and cars on the pages of our blog. For example, the CSL Batmobile in the header is a high budget, full restoration done by a specialty BMW Shop here in California. We recently featured that car to celebrate the amount of work that goes into restoring such an iconic car. I could go on and on with a list of cars that have graced our pages, but my point is that I think you'll be pleasantly surprised if you put aside your misconceptions and give it a chance.  

Outworlder
Outworlder

 @brony truth. Stance is for kids, err.. sorry, "adults" that fiend over collecting cute stickers for their cars.

iRACECAR
iRACECAR

 @StanceWorks you can't have one without the other and if the craftsmanship is flawed by laziness and wrong-headed, unsafe planning, so is the style. it's not so simple to separate the two. i could go on, but that's beside the point. i have an idea. if you want to truly prove your convictions, and to show us that you are fully accepting of all makes, models, styles, and the people that drive them, i'm going to issue you a challenge. do a serious article on PT Cruiser enthusiasts and their cars. 

Outworlder
Outworlder

 @StanceWorks I agree with Euro Only. Trends and fads are readily apparent and the intentions of those who pursue them are clear. Being that this is one of the many "stance" sites out there, it's predictable that you would advocate more open mindedness... because frankly, all the heat is coming from the other side, not the other way around. It's not logically possible to hate on a well engineered race car, but it is rather justified if you dislike a car with bright colors and no regards for proper suspension geometry.

 

You do realize that being able to handle criticism is a good thing? If one person criticizes you, it might be an outlier. If multiple people criticize you, there might be a truth to be sought. This is the best way to shine a mirror in front of someone and show them the fool. It's a very effective method of catalyzing self-reflection and ultimately (hopefully), improvement.

StanceWorks
StanceWorks moderator

While I agree that nothing can exist without both craftsmanship and style coexisting in some form or fashion, I do believe it is possible to have imbalanced levels of the two. I have seen builds where the builder had a great sense of style and knew exactly how to build a beautiful car, but when it came time to execute the plan, they fell short due to mediocre fabrication or improper techniques. Conversely, I've seen true craftsmen who fabricate and paint with the best of them, but they lacked a sense of style so the end result lacked cohesion or aesthetic power. It's funny that you mention the PT Cruiser as it's a constant discussion between Mike and me. When I was younger, I had my heart set on owning a PT Cruiser and it was nearly my first car. I still have plans for a PT build looming in the back of my head amongst the other daydreams.  I'd happily feature a PT Cruiser on the site if we come across one.  A lot of it simply comes down to which cars cross our path as we attend shows, races, and get togethers.

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